one-year-on-report

The Cabinet Office published a review of the first year of the Civil Service Reform Plan which provides an account of progress to date. Success in some areas – such as starting to move more government services online and improving the delivery of major projects – is detailed alongside slower progress in other areas.




The One Year On report is a frank and honest assessment of progress. For the year ahead, responsibilities have been clearly identified which gives us confidence that the pace of delivery can increase.

Many aspects of the Civil Service are already world class. But there are lots of areas where it needs to modernise and change in order to provide better services for the public and better value for money to taxpayers.

The next stage of Civil Service Reform will see more effective support for ministers and greater accountability for senior civil servants. This will help Government deliver further savings for taxpayers and better public services.

The Cabinet Office has published a review of the first year of the Civil Service Reform Plan, which detail’s progress to date. Success in some areas – such as starting to move more government services online and improving the delivery of major projects – is detailed alongside slower progress in other areas.

In line with the ground-breaking Major Project Authority’s first annual report, traffic light assessments are published alongside all actions from last year’s reform plan showing where progress is on track and where more effort is needed.

Read how other departments have progressed on implementing the Civil Service Reform Plan – One Year On.

  • A.Smith

    I
    think the paragraph outlining that despite pay restraint public sector pay
    increases are exceeding those in the private sector misses the point. For a
    long period during the boom years private sector pay massively exceeded the
    rates of public sector pay, but of course Ministers and Head of the Civil
    Service never said that civil service pay should be increased to match this.
    Now that the rates of private sector pay are on average lower (let’s not forget
    many outside government are still getting significant rises, an average figure
    masks this), then it’s unjust to say the public sector must match this when
    during economic growth a vast majority of non-SCS government officials have
    barely moved up their respective pay scales over a ten year period. It defies
    logic that the goal of ‘building a truly exceptional Civil Service, delivering
    the best for Britain’ is being built around not rewarding and motivating excellence
    by cutting pay, increasing working hours and attacking terms and conditions
    more generally. It’s hardly the best way of retaining and attracting the type
    of public sector workforce needed to deliver in an ever challenging world!

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